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Editor's Blog and Industry Comments

Tips for on-line parental control

26 September, 2007
Broadbandchoices has conducted some research into parent's methods for monitoring their children's on-line activity and thereby preventing them from being exposed to danger.
Although parental concern and activity in this respect has jumped significantly since the last survey, there is still a large dependence on verbal agreements and trust.

The survey went on to demonstrate that this level of trust wasn't justified as a large percentage of the children surveyed admitted to significant chat-room and social networking activity, the very areas that are most likely to result in problems of identity theft or abuse.

In response to this, the on-line broadband service comparison company released its own top four tips for keeping children out of harms way when they're surfing the net.

The number one tip is to use parental control software either supplied by the ISP or as a boxed product from one of the anti-malware companies. Although this takes some time in setting up and maintaining, it is by far the most effective way of controlling which sites are visited and raising alarms based on key-words that spring up in chat-rooms.

Tip number two is to educate them about the dangers and what they should do under certain circumstances. This is particularly important with regards to providing personal information or agreeing to meetings.

The third tip is to use one computer for family use and keep it in a common area which although sensible, is probably the one step that will lead to a deep rift developing in the generation gap.

The final tip is to use a download monitor to see exactly how much of their activity is involved in downloading things off the internet.

A download monitor is one of the products offered by Broadbandchoices.co.uk
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