Free Newsletter
Register for our Free Newsletters
Newsletter
Zones
Access Control
LeftNav
Alarms
LeftNav
Biometrics
LeftNav
Detection
LeftNav
Deutsche Zone (German Zone)
LeftNav
Education, Training and Professional Services
LeftNav
Government Programmes
LeftNav
Guarding, Equipment and Enforcement
LeftNav
Industrial Computing Security
LeftNav
IT Security
LeftNav
Physical Security
LeftNav
Surveillance
LeftNav
View All
Other Carouselweb publications
Carousel Web
Defense File
New Materials
Pro Health Zone
Pro Manufacturing Zone
Pro Security Zone
Web Lec
 
ProSecurityZone Sponsor
 
ProSecurityZone Sponsor
 
ProSecurityZone Sponsor
 
ProSecurityZone Sponsor
 
ProSecurityZone Sponsor
 
ProSecurityZone Sponsor
 
 
Editor's Blog and Industry Comments

The Use of Biometrics In The Fight Against Terrorism

27 October, 2010
Biometric technology continues to be developed for diversified uses by Governments and commercial industry but anti-terrorism requirements are providing the impetus for tomorrow's developments
Freedom of movement and the ability to easily acquire and use false documents provide a mechanism for serious crime and terrorism and one technology that provides a defence against these freedoms is biometric authentication and recognition.

Biometrics provides an ability to identify a person through biological features which are hard to fake or disguise. The main features for the purposes of terrorism prevention are finger-print, vein patterns, face and iris though combinations of these factors can be used in multi-biometric identification systems.

All of them operate on the same principle of encoding the biological features of a person digitally and saving it as a unique template. The mathematical algorithm which defines the template is based on parameters which, if repeated, will produce the same template thus enabling a comparison to be made between two identities.

Comparing a "live" face with a photograph is a common technique used at airport passport control stations where the traveller looks directly into a camera and the resulting image is compared to the passport photographs. This is the identity verification model of biometrics and is the one which is most often used also in commercial applications such as access control and consumer applications such as fingerprint recognition for accessing laptops or USB drives.

Unlike the 1-to-1 algorithm of the identity verification model, the identity recognition model is a 1-to-many algorithm that seeks to identify a "live" image with thousands or even millions of templates stored on watch-lists. These watch-lists contain the biometric identities of known criminals and terrorists. The main use of identity recognition biometrics is at border crossing points and crowded venues. It can be used either by using a high definition camera which scans a crowd or it can be used at a single access point such as a turnstile where each person has to enter singly and wait for the gate to activate. While the person is waiting, the algorithm runs.

The main technological detractor to face recognition in crowds or at turnstiles is facial angle. Turnstile systems often use psychological methods to attract the attention of the person passing through the gate to make him look in a certain direction ensuring that the face angle matches the limited requirements of the algorithm.

So-called 3D face recognition systems, which can generate a repeatable template regardless of the inclination of the head of the target has so far had millions of dollars pumped into research and development but remains the holy grail of the industry.

Read more from biometric suppliers in our Biometrics Zone
Bookmark and Share