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Editor's Blog and Industry Comments

Intelligent Video Analytics For Remote Facility Surveillance

25 August, 2010
ObjectVideo discusses the role of computer vision-based analytics in the analysis of complex surveillance environments involving remote facilities
Interoperability is ObjectVideo's philosophy when it comes to the deployment of analytics-enabled solutions to surveillance environments. From its beginnings, the company has always believed that being an open, scalable and flexible ingredient of a larger surveillance solution is the key to successful analytics installations and it has placed a lot of emphasis on achieving this.

ObjectVideo supports ONVIF (the Open Network Video Interface Forum) and is an active member of PSIA (the Physical Security Interoperability Alliance) to promote the development of open standards in the surveillance industry. Through this, its own OV Ready protocol and strategic alliances with major camera, VMS and storage manufacturers, ObjectVideo enjoys a wide range of surveillance components with which it is compatible.

I spoke to Richard Boltze, the EMEA Manager for ObjectVideo and Ed Troha, the company's Managing Director of Global Marketing to ask them what this flexible system ingredient brings to the party.

The answer lies in the level of detail of the analysis. ObjectVideo takes a rules-based approach to the analysis task, allowing the user to define multiple rules that can then be adapted and updated based on forensic analysis of previous events. Rather than relying on video motion detection to sense the presence of an intruder, rules can be set to take account of parameters such as duration, behaviour and type of object. An example would be maintenance visits to a pumping station. An alarm condition could be set if a vehicle of unexpected size arrives at an unexpected time and stays longer than the usual duration. Another example could be that a single person approaching a pipeline is unlikely to be involved in theft whereas a group of people performing some construction activity around the pipe would be a condition under which an alarm is raised. Each time a significant event is recorded, forensic analysis of the meta data associated with the event can be used to modify the rule set providing constant improvement to the analysis capability.

Using this wider degree of analysis, ObjectVideo allows the user to examines a combination of rules based alerts and easily tell the software to associate certain events with priority scenarios to raise appropriate alarms allowing control room staff to examine the data stream and take appropriate action.

When asked if the solution could be used with thermal imaging, Richard replied, "Video analytics works particularly well with thermal imaging systems due to the high contrast. This is especially true for larger distances and under severe weather conditions"

Such conditions are strongly associated with pipeline and railway infrastructure surveillance making a combination of thermal imaging and video analytics which make use of computer vision-based analytics a strong choice for such facilities.
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