Free Newsletter
Register for our Free Newsletters
Newsletter
Zones
Access Control
LeftNav
Alarms
LeftNav
Biometrics
LeftNav
Detection
LeftNav
Deutsche Zone (German Zone)
LeftNav
Education, Training and Professional Services
LeftNav
Government Programmes
LeftNav
Guarding, Equipment and Enforcement
LeftNav
Industrial Computing Security
LeftNav
IT Security
LeftNav
Physical Security
LeftNav
Surveillance
LeftNav
View All
Other Carouselweb publications
Carousel Web
Defense File
New Materials
Pro Health Zone
Pro Manufacturing Zone
Pro Security Zone
Web Lec
 
ProSecurityZone Sponsor
 
ProSecurityZone Sponsor
 
ProSecurityZone Sponsor
 
ProSecurityZone Sponsor
 
ProSecurityZone Sponsor
 
ProSecurityZone Sponsor
 
 
Editor's Blog and Industry Comments

Domodedovo Explosion Places Question Over Public Area Security

25 January, 2011
Suicide bomber hits soft target in Moscow despite recent heavy investment in security technology at Domodedovo airport.
Recognition that airport arrivals halls are soft targets for terrorist attacks is not something that has emerged recently. In 2007, a failed car bomb put a public area of Glasgow at risk and the industry has long debated the vulnerability of public access areas at busy airports. Yesterday's explosion at Moscow's Domodedovo airport has now chrystallised attention on this gaping hole in airport security measures.



Russia woke up to its vulnerability in 2004 when suicide bombers detonated explosives aboard two aircraft after boarding them at Domodedovo. The airport invested heavily in security equipment from internationally renowned companies such as GE and Rapiscan as well as installing biometric face recognition equipment to detect passengers on no-fly lists. This was all very admirable but couldn't have prevented the tragedy that took the lives of at least 35 people in Moscow yesterday.



All the technology invested in Moscow's second airport isn't used in the public areas which mill with people in the same way as main railway stations or busy city squares. In these kind of areas, it is vigilance, processes and training that play as big a role as technology in the prevention of terrorism. Unfortunately, these are evidently not Russia's strong points.



Elena Galanova heads the press service at the airport and puts it in a nutshell with her opening statement in which she told journalists that "The airport doesn't hold itself responsible for the explosion that took place". These were her opening words and reflect a general unwillingness to be held accountable. Even the press secretary of the country's Prime Minister, Dmitriy Peskov, revealed this attitude when talking to the press. When asked what the Government was doing in order to minimise the threat of this kind of incident occurring again, he replied, "This is the prerogative of the special forces, not the Government". The head of airport security is investigating the incident to find out what went wrong and "who is responsible".



With these kinds of attitudes, nobody is accountable for anything and the carnage will continue. The lesson to be learnt from the Domodedovo airport bombing relates to non-technology factors of security management, crowd management and renewed attitudes.
Bookmark and Share