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Editor's Blog and Industry Comments

A new angle on the social networking controversy

25 September, 2007
With so much newstest having recently been published about the controversy surrounding social networking sites such as MySpace and Facebook, its clear that the dangers of identity theft through this media can't be ignored.
In light of all this negative press, many corporations have battened their hatches down against the problem once and for all by banning the use of these sites in the workplace entirely much to the dismay of the workforce who've now got used to using these sites.

That dismay, however, may just turn to relief if you believe what Backgroundchecking.com, the credential verification company, is saying about the use of these sites. Taking a completely different angle on the debate, the people at Backgroundchecking.com are saying that by using these sites indiscriminately, workers could actually be damaging their own career prospects.

Social networking sites are in the public domain and so the information they contain is also public and increasingly being used by credential reference agencies to seek additional information about job candidates during the vetting process.

Steve Bailey of Backgroundchecking.com therefore warns users of these sites that indiscriminate comments or information about themselves that they would not normally distribute on the job market could catch up with them when they would least like it to do so.

For more information about this, read the full article by Steve Bailey on this site.
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