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News

Internet data legislation challenge for smaller Internet Service Providers

CopperEye : 29 June, 2009  (Technical Article)
CopperEye has outlined the main considerations relating to the data retention directive released by the Home Office
The Home Office has recently announced its approach to the second phase of the data retention directive, which is focused on internet data. The first phase of the directive came into force in October 2007 and required telecommunications companies to retain fixed and mobile communications data. The second phase now includes internet-related communication data, such as broadband access, internet telephony and email event data, to be retained in case required by law enforcement and other public authorities. CopperEye, a leading provider of enterprise data management and compliance solutions, has enabled a number of Communications Service Providers across the globe to fully comply with the directive. Providers need to carefully consider their approach to complying with the directive, as internet data is far more complex to manage for a number of reasons.

Duncan Pauly, CTO, CopperEye outlines key considerations:

1) Security - with today's compliance requirements it is vital to ensure that data is securely retained to prevent unauthorised access and make sure there is an automated system in place for the destruction of data that falls beyond the legal retention period

2) Proportionate access - only data that is both relevant and appropriate to an investigation should be disclosed to an authorised agency

3) Legal evidence - ensure that any disclosed information is both accurate and complete for the avoidance of unnecessary or inappropriate investigations

4) Timeliness - the information should be both collected and disclosed in a timely manner to avoid delays to investigative processes

5) Total Cost of Ownership - the solution should afford proportionate costs in terms of hardware, implementation and operation of the compliance system and deliver long term value for the service provider.

Carmen Carey, CEO CopperEye comments: "Communications data is a key piece of the puzzle used for investigations of serious crimes and threats to national security. It is essential that vital data is securely retained. Providers should consider that existing systems may not have the capability to comply with new legislative requirements. Unlike telecommunications companies that usually have extensive data management capabilities, many internet service providers are relatively small in comparison and are not able to manage the volumes of data that this directive demands. Therefore, they must implement a data management solution that is appropriate to their size and needs and make use of the most appropriate technology to satisfy the European Union Data Retention Directive requirements. Further, providers must turn to solutions that are proven to support the Directive and that are ETSI compliant - anything else is an expensive compromise."

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