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News

Great Lake monster hunt with video analytics

Aimetis : 04 July, 2008  (Application Story)
Older than the Loch Ness monster legend, Storsjoodjuret has baffled Swedes for 400 years while they waited for IR vision and video analytics to keep constant watch over Lake Storsjon and provide instant alerts when it appears.
The story of Storsjoodjuret (the Great Lake Sea Monster) is more than 400 years old, with sightings dating back to 1635. The legend tells of two trolls boiling a kettle on the shores of Lake Storsjon, a 300-foot deep lake in Jamtland, northern Sweden. Suddenly, a strange black serpent-like creature with a cat-like head jumped out of a kettle and into the water. Today there are over 200 documented witness reports from more than 500 people who have seen Storsjoodjuret.

Descriptions of the monster vary from 14 metres in length with humps and a small head to 3 metres in length with short thick feet, a large head and round eyes. In recent years there have been several serious investigations into Storsjoodjuret, but to date, nothing conclusive has been found.

Aimetis Symphony video management and analytics software is running on underwater and surface cameras around Lake Storsjon in an attempt to document video proof of the existence of the Great Lake Sea Monster.

With several reported sightings, but no documented proof of the existence of Storsjoodjuret, the Local Municipality of Bergs Community along with Company Association in Svenstavik had a dream to conclusively demonstrate that Storsjoodjuret was in fact, a reality. Their idea was to install cameras underwater and at the surface of the lake to catch any suspicious activity. However, reviewing the constant stream of video would be a daunting task and there was still the chance that something could be missed. The municipality and business association wanted an intelligent video system that would only alert them to potential monster activity. Additionally, the solution needed to be flexible and easy to maintain.

Because monster surveillance was required both above and below the water, the analytics needed to be highly reliable and accurate so that natural elements of the environment like light reflecting from the water, seagulls, and waves would be ignored.. Aimetis Symphony, a combined video management and analytics software platform, was selected for a number of reasons. First, Aimetis Symphony was proven to have the lowest rate of false alarms, particularly in outdoor environments, and was also being successfully used by one of the members of the business association, Curt Johnsson, owner of the local ICA Supermarket. Additionally, the software was selected because it was extremely versatile with an open architecture that meant it could be deployed on a range of different manufacturer cameras that were best suited to the application.

With the help of UTS, a Swedish system integration company and Aimetis Certified Partner, Aimetis Symphony was installed on underwater VGA cameras, a surface-level FLIR thermal vision camera to catch the monster through fog, snow, rain and in total darkness, as well as a number of other cameras looking in all directions. There is also a camera dedicated to observing the other cameras to ensure the monster tracking operation is not compromised.

The images from the cameras are streamed live to www.storsjoodjuret.nu so that the public can monitor any monster activity. Additionally, when Aimetis Symphony detects potential Storsjodjuret movements, it sends an automatic email containing a photo to members of the municipality and the association so that the activity can be immediately verified.

"Aimetis Symphony is helping make an old dream come true, said Curt Johnsson, Member, Company Association in Svenstavik. "It will be on constant watch through sun, rain, snow, fog and darkness to capture video evidence of the Great Lake Sea Monster, something that residents and visitors have been trying to do for more than 400 years."
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