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News

Firefox Vulnerability Discovered After Nobel Prize Site Infection

Norman Security : 28 October, 2010  (Technical Article)
Zero-day exploit uncovered by Norman ASA which affects Firefox browsers after Trojan infects site of the Nobel Peace Prize
Norman ASA researchers have identified new Trojan malware that infected the Nobel Peace Prize site recently. The new Trojan was transmitted through a vulnerability in Firefox version 3.5 and 3.6.

The Norman Malware Detection Team in Oslo found that the attack was enabled by a zero-day vulnerability in the popular Firefox web browser and recommend all Internet users be cautious when surfing the net. If a user visited the Nobel Prize site while the attack was active early today (Tuesday, 26th October 2010) using Firefox 3.5 or 3.6, the malware might be installed on the user's computer without warning.

The malware would then attempt to connect to two Internet addresses, both which point to a server in Taiwan. If the connection was successful, the attacker would have access to the infected computer. This Trojan could be active on other websites.

All Norman antimalware solutions for consumers, the enterprise and government users have detection for this Trojan and any attempt at infection will be blocked.

A Trojan is malicious software (malware) that does unwanted actions - for example, it allows unauthorized access to a user's computer, most often to steal secrets such as passwords and financial information. Mozilla Firefox is an open source web browser and is believed to be the second most widely used browser in the world. A zero-day attack is a threat that tries to exploit Internet or computer software vulnerabilities while no patch or remedy is available.
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